Author Topic: Florida Panther Pending Delisting and Stripped of its Endangered Protections?  (Read 5810 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0

Wait... Secretary of Interior on the "Genetically Manipulated" Florida Panther??

Citizens Science

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0

North Carolina Cougars -

Cougar Sightings in Washington County

Hyde, Tyrrell, Washington and Bertie Counties in Northeast North Carolina have had a good share of cougar and black panther sightings.

Jimmy Davis, a Washington County resident, saw a black panther twice within three days in the same area. It was about 4PM in September 2011 the first time Davis saw the black cat. He was on Jerdan Thicket Road driving about 45 mph when it crossed the road in front of him. He said he slowed down, the cat stopped and looked at him, then it jumped from the shoulder of the road across a wide ditch and disappeared into the woods. He said the cat was about 4 ½ feet long with a tail almost as long. Its ears were turned down and he saw a flash of white on its face, which he said could have been glare or maybe a marking.

Davis was taking a walk after doing some gardening on a dirt road alongside the woods the second time he saw the big cat. It came out of the woods in front of him and jumped across the path and the ditch in one leap then faded into the woods.

Davis grew up in the rural area surrounding Long Ridge and Hollis Roads near Plymouth, North Carolina. He knows for a fact what he saw in September 2011 was neither a bear or a bobcat. “I know what I saw,” he said.

Sandra Lee also saw what she describes as a black panther several years ago on Hollis Rd. It was dusk and she was turning onto Hollis Road from Hwy 32, going to visit a friend. The panther walked out onto the road as she was turning.

She said, “It just walked at a relatively slow pace for some time, while I was behind him, trying to figure out what in the heck it was. I knew it was some kind of cat because it had a long tail, and moved like a cat, but it was so large!”

The cougar’s cry has sometimes been described as sounding like a woman screaming. Gail Harrison Hodges of Washington County believes she heard that scream when she was a child. Her mother had taken the children to a field on their farm to chop weeds. The sound was scary enough that her mother sent them running for cover in the car. “I can still hear that sound, unlike anything I have ever heard.”

Gail said her late husband had a sighting on a Weyerhaeuser logging road off Hollis Road near where it joins Long Ridge Road. It was at twilight. She says he was very specific about the fact that it was a black panther.

Cougar Sighting Near Pungo Lake

Claude Edward Jones, who grew up in Plymouth and now lives in Beaufort County, shares his cougar story:
“I was goose hunting on some land in Wenona. Having no luck, we decided to drive over to the Lake to view the birds. It was getting late and we knew we had to leave before dark. We were traveling down D Canal Road very slow because it was very wet and narrow. We were traveling south towards 43, when out of the brush, on the vehicle driver side, this huge black cat, not a house cat and not a bear, quickly leaped in front of us, then crossed the road, and disappeared into the trees that bordered the canal on the passenger side. I couldn't believe my eyes!”

Bertie and Tyrrell County Cougar Sightings

Alfred Smith, a Washington County native says he has seen cougars in Bertie, Washington, and Tyrrell counties over the past twenty years.

“In about 1997 we were leaving Roper to go to Belhaven one evening. It was after sundown but not dark because I did not have my headlights on. It was in the earl spring. We had just turned off of Millpond Road onto the Railroad Bed. There is or was a pasture on the left-hand side of this road not far from the turnoff. A big cat came out of the pasture about 100 yards down the road. I was driving about 45 or 50 mph and slowed down. The cougar did not seem to be in any hurry crossing the road. It was about 5 feet long with a tail that was 4 or 5 feet long that stuck straight out behind it. As it disappeared into the brush on the right-hand side of the road another cat about the same size came from the pasture following the first one. This cat was solid black and was moving much faster than the first on but we were much closer to it when we saw it.”

Smith had another sighting about the same period of time, 1996 to 1998. He was deer hunting with a friend early one morning in November in Bertie County on a track of land owned by Weyerhaeuser Paper Mill. It was early morning and they were walking along a canal bank to get to their stand. A cougar jumped the 15-foot wide canal and landed in the trail about 100 feet ahead of them. He described the cat as about 5 feet long and with a tail that was four or five feet long. He said it never made a sound as it came and was gone in an instant, but he has no doubt about what they saw.

Another incident happened late one evening while Alfred Smith was coming back from playing golf in Windsor. He was driving along highway 308 just east of the San Sucie Road in Bertie County when he saw a big cat sitting beside the road.

“Just sitting there like a dog would sit. At first, I thought it was a wounded deer that had maybe been hit by a car or something.”

He slammed on breaks to stop and the cat took one leap across the shoulder of the road and the road ditch and into the woods. Smith estimated the cat jumped 30 to 40 feet with one bound from a sitting position. The cat looked to be at least 6 feet long when stretched out plus at least a five-foot tail.

Smith said, “Talking with friends who I worked with and people who drive this road regularly say the cat has been spotted several times along 308 in this area.”

Hollis  Road, Plymouth, NC - Hollis Rd, Plymouth, NC 27962, USA get directions
Sighting Location of Cougar in Washington County near Plymouth, NC
Cougar Signs

While there are many reports of cougars in North Carolina, word alone is not enough to convince wildlife officials. They need “proof” to be convinced. Physical evidence or even credible photographs have yet to be produced to back up the stories. There are some signs to look for that may suggest the presence of a cougar. They are scrape marks which are left by males scraping together a pile of leaves or debris and then urinating or defecating on it to mark his territory, tracks, feces, tree scratches, and hidden food caches such as a deer carcass. If you have a camera handy photograph any sign you come across so it can be verified later. Of course, a photograph of the actual cat would help substantiate your sighting, although in this age of digital photo editing, even a picture may not be convincing enough.
Citizens Science

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concludes eastern cougar extinct - WHY? 

They (USFWS) invented a “NEW” Genetically Modified Puma then even admitted it.  There is just one issue, this genetically invent puma is not endangered, nor is it covered by the ESA.

Its important to know, while they conclude the eastern cougar is extinct its still listed as an endangered species and is granted protection.

Although the eastern cougar has been on the endangered species list since 1973, its existence has long been questioned. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) conducted a formal review of the available information and, in a report issued today, concludes the eastern cougar is extinct and recommends the subspecies be removed from the endangered species list.

“We recognize that many people have seen cougars in the wild within the historical range of the eastern cougar,” said the Service’s Northeast Region Chief of Endangered Species Martin Miller. “However, we believe those cougars are not the eastern cougar subspecies. We found no information to support the existence of the eastern cougar.”

Reports of cougars observed in the wild examined during the review process described cougars of other subspecies, often South American subspecies, that had been held in captivity and had escaped or been released to the wild, as well as wild cougars of the western United States subspecies that had migrated eastward to the Midwest.

During the review, the Service received 573 responses to a request for scientific information about the possible existence of the eastern cougar subspecies; conducted an extensive review of U.S. and Canadian scientific literature; and requested information from the 21 States within the historical range of the subspecies. No States expressed a belief in the existence of an eastern cougar population. According to Dr. Mark McCollough, the Service’s lead scientist for the eastern cougar, the subspecies of eastern cougar has likely been extinct since the 1930s.

The Service initiated the review as part of its obligations under the Endangered Species Act. The Service will prepare a proposal to remove the eastern cougar from the endangered species list, since extinct animals are not eligible for protection under the Endangered Species Act. The proposal will be made available for public comment.

The Service's decision to declare the eastern cougar extinct does not affect the status of the Florida panther, another wild cat subspecies listed as endangered. Though the Florida panther once ranged throughout the Southeast, it now exists in less than five percent of its historic habitat and in only one breeding population of 120 to 160 animals in southwestern Florida.
Citizens Science

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0
Cougar / Panther Caught on TrailCam - Durham County, NC
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2017, 12:52:12 PM »
BREAKING - Cougar Sighting Durham County, North Carolina -

Eastern Cougar, Invented Florida Panther (GMO) or House Cat?

We're in agreement with Dr. Kays...  Might interesting "Perspective" on a #Durham house cat...










http://abc11.com/pets-animals/cougar-or-cat-durham-trying-to-id-animal-in-picture-/2457035/


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 11:51:27 PM by citizensscience »
Citizens Science

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0
Citizens Science

Puma concolor

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Welcome, From the Citizens Science Team!

Puma concolor

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Welcome, From the Citizens Science Team!
Thank you. What you are doing I have already done. Without explaining it in a public forum I'd like to discuss this with you  please.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 08:46:23 PM by Puma concolor »

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0
Puma - Welcome to the Forum. 

There are a few volunteers here dedicated to the research and exposing the truth about the Florida Panther. 

We have more documentation that I'll try and get posted for you. 

Feel free to join the discussion-

CS
Citizens Science

Puma concolor

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Welcome, From the Citizens Science Team!
I'm interested in speaking to the admisnitraor that created this thread.

citizensscience

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1169
  • Karma: +0/-0

I guess when you invent a hybrid you have to sacrifice something?


Citizens Science